Message from Lisa Wells:

Aloha! Enjoy!

Please check out the Hokule'a site and keep track of the voyage. There are many great sites highlighted in this issue which have great resources for teaching astronomy, physics, and Earth sciences. Many of the sites have video demonstrations, exercises, and projects to do in the classroom. We are grateful for your feedback and support of our venture. Feel free to send an email.


Contents:


CFHT Community Outreach

Recent Past Events

May 3rd, 2014: AstroDay was held at Prince Kuhio Plaza in Hilo, from 10am to 4pm. There were displays and interactive demonstrations with contests, giveaways, and entertainment. The Mauna Kea Observatories and organizations enjoyed the day and we hope families had fun. Click on the images below to enlarge.

Opening Ceremony 2014 Coin Contest Winner Looking through a telescope The CFHT booth Executive Director Dr. Doug Simmons with software engineer Dr. Jim Thomas An exoplanet poster

AstroDay 2014


Upcoming Events

July - August, 2014: This year marks CFHT's 35th anniversary, and the Thelma Parker Library has asked us to set up a display in their entrance. Please stop by the library when you have a chance and take a look at the milestones of the Observatory and the video.

Friends of Thelma Parker Library

Facebook page for Thelma Parker Library


Check out the CFHT picture of the month, the bulge of our own Milky Way galaxy.

Hawaiian Starlight

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HelioViewer

This is a great website with recent images of the sun taken in many wavelengths which may be used to explain visible features on the sun.

HelioViewer

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The Voyage of Hokule'a Society

The Polynesian Voyaging Society has once again set sail on a voyage around the world on Hokule'a and Hikianalia. Navigating by the stars they will travel around the world. All may watch the progress from their website and read the blogs posted by the voyagers. There is even an option to ask the voyagers questions.

Polynesian Voyaging Society

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NASA Wavelength

This site has a great deal of information and teaching resourses for all school levels. There is a great deal to navigate in these pages but some of the wonderful storybooks and materials will only enhance classroom participation and discussion. Many of these resources are free or low cost to put together.

NASA Wavelength

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Maunakea Astronomy Outreach Committee

The MKAOC is set up as a resourse for upcoming outreach events in Hawaii, and interesting discoveries and images produced by the observatories on Maunakea.

Mauna Kea Astronomy Outreach Committee

Mauna Kea Observatories Outreach Committee on facebook ( This is the old name of the group.)

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Here, There, and Everywhere

The Chandra X-ray telescope hosts the "Here, There, and Everywhere" site which has great videos, demonstrations, and activities which may be used in the classroom. Many of the physical principles have examples not just in space, but include applications on Earth.

Here, There, and Everywhere

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Upcoming Astronomical Events
  • Eclipses - There will be a total lunar eclipse occuring on the evening of October 7th, beginning at 10:15 pm HST. It will last until 3:33 am. Totality will last for almost 1 hour. The moment of greatest eclipse will occur at 12:54 am. We are fortunate that we will see the entire eclipse from Hawaii. A partial solar eclipse will occur on October 23rd but will only be visible from north Pacific waters, a part of Eastern Russia, the Artic ocean, and almost all of the North American continent. Unfortunately it will not be visible from Hawaii. Look for it if you happen to be traveling to the mainland at this time.
  • Meteor Showers -
    • The Comet 209P/LINEAR debris was predicted to be the strongest meteor shower of the year, occured on May 23rd at 8-9 pm. We did not have a good prediction for the number expected and the Moon was optimal, but this event turned out to be a dud.
    • The S delta-Aquariids are predicted to occur the evening of July 28th, morning of July 29th. The peak is predicted at 11pm HST on the 28th and the Moon will be a cresent in the evening sky so will be set long before the peak. Expect about 20 meteors per hour. The radiant is in the constellation Aquarius.
    • The Perseid meteor shower will peak the morning of August 12th at 10 am HST however, the early morning hours before sunrise should produce roughly 90 per hour. The Moon will be just past full so it will hamper seeing the faintest of the meteors. Look to the constellation Perseus and know that this shower usually is visible for a day or 2 on either side of the peak.
    • The Orionid Meteor shower will peak at 7am on October 21st. Predictions are for 20 per hour and the Moon will not be rising until just before the sun. Look toward the constellation Orion before the sunrise for best viewing.
    All these meteor showers are best viewed from midnight to sunrise. Meteors should be visible for 1-3 days either side of the peak also. For more about watching meteor showers, check out the site for The American Meteor Society.
  • Planets -
    • Saturn will be within half a degree of the Moon on the evening of July 7th at 4pm. The Moon will occult the planet but it will not be visible from Hawaii.
    • Mars will be 1.4 degrees from Spica in the evening sky on July 12th.
    • Mercury will be 3 degrees from M35 in the evening of July 14th.
    • Venus will be 1.5 degrees from M35 in the morning sky July 20th.
    • Mars will be 2 degrees from the Moon near midnight on the evening of July 2nd.
    • Saturn will be 0.1 degrees from the Moon at 1 am on July 4th. Occultation will occur but won't be visible from Hawaii.
    • Look for Uranus close to the Moon on the morning of July 14th before sunrise.
    • Look for Venus, Jupiter and M44 (the Beehive) close together on the morning of July 18th.
    • Saturn will again be close to the Moon in the evening after sunset on August 31st.
    • Ceres, Saturn and Vesta will all be close to the Moon on the evening/morning of September 27th/28th.
    • Look for Uranus close to the Moon after sunset on October 8th.
  • Comets - There are several challenging objects to find in the sky so check out updates at the Sky Hound site: Comet Chasing. You may need binoculars or a small telescope to see the faintest of these objects.
  • Equinox - The autumn equinox will occur on September 22nd at 4:29 pm.

All times listed above are HST unless otherwise indicated. The link below contains many calendars and includes a nice section on astronomical events. Check it out!

Calendars

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We gratefully acknowledge the following online sources: Google Search Engine, and the Science Daily.
This page is compiled by Lisa Wells, CFHT Remote Observer
This page is designed by Tito Jankowski, maintained by Lisa Wells, CFHT Remote Observer